You see someone who is sitting down and is itching their skin and when you introduce yourself, they turn around and speak to you in a hoarse voice, have swollen lips, mouth and tongue and red welts on their skin.  What would you do? Although we are not doctors and nurses, a First Aider (now called a First Aid Provider) should be able to spot and ask questions to notice major signs and symptoms of a condition, in this case, anaphylaxis or a severe life-threatening allergic reaction. Like many...
Thunderstorm asthma came into prominence last year as 9 people died and others developed signs and symptoms of moderate to severe asthma.  Asthma is a long-term inflammatory condition where the airways become irritated by a trigger leading to difficulty breathing, coughing, and other signs of discomfort including chest tightness. Not all storms in the ‘pollen season’ will cause the specific thunderstorm that occurred last year. Last year, several meteorological events occurred including a hi...
First aid is a useful skill to have, but when you’re around children it becomes far more important, as accidents tend to happen more to children than adults. Here are four of the most common emergency situations involving children that you may encounter. 1. Falls The effects of falling can range from bleeding and abrasions to sprains, fractures and head injuries. While injuries from falling can be treated with first aid, head injuries can be more serious. If a child experiences vomiting, los...
One in three Australians suffer from allergies – more than almost any other country in the world. Australia has seen an alarming increase in allergy sufferers over the past three decades, although doctors aren’t sure why. In severe cases allergic reactions can be fatal, so knowing how to recognise and treat them could save the life of someone you know. What Causes an Allergic Reaction? An allergic reaction happens when a foreign substance enters the body, and the body misidentifies the subst...
22282VIC Course in the Management of Asthma Risks and Emergencies in the Workplace has been accredited from 1 January 2015.  As of 10 October 2014, there are no registered training organisations approved to deliver the course.  You can read more about the course on the training.gov.au . This course is equivalent to and will replace 22024VIC Course in the emergency management of asthma in the workplace . This does not mean that your qualification in 22024VIC will expire (technically, it will ...
A number of our clients work in the child in care industry and require VET accredited training in first aid, asthma and anaphylaxis.  One of the most common questions that we are asked is "what course should I do to work in childcare?" Our answer is to refer to the regulator of quality training for childcare workers in Australia - the Australian Children's Education & Care Quality Authority (ACECQA).  They have a page on their website that enables people to check which first aid, asthma and ...
We're coming into Spring in Sydney and everything is starting to grow.  People are spending more time outdoors, probably gardening, and going into the realm of insects and spiders.  Naturally, they will want to protect their patch. There's only one spider in Sydney that you really need to worry about - the Funnel Web.  Their bites are the only ones that have been known to cause a death. The symptoms of a bite from a Funnel Web are the following: Pain, but not much inflammation at the site Pr...
The first aid units HLTAID001 through to HLTAID007 have recently been reviewed by a First Aid Subject Matter Expert Group. The consultation period for industry and the public on the draft Units has just concluded. Pending feedback, the next release of these units will be a Community Services and Health Industry Skills Council (CS&HISC) upgrade, resulting in no change to code or title of the units as they will be deemed equivalent. The release of the revised versions of HLTAID001 through to H...

You see someone who is sitting down and is itching their skin and when you introduce yourself, they turn around and speak to you in a hoarse voice, have swollen lips, mouth and tongue and red welts on their skin.  What would you do?

Although we are not doctors and nurses, a First Aider (now called a First Aid Provider) should be able to spot and ask questions to notice major signs and symptoms of a condition, in this case, anaphylaxis or a severe life-threatening allergic reaction.

Like many conditions, someone can have mild, moderate, or severe allergies to various triggers or allergens.  We should always follow the casualties’ medical action plan whether it is formally written and presented to us such as in child care, they have their medical action plan with them and / or they give us information verbally.  In some situations, people have a mild to moderate allergy and will take antihistamines, nasal sprays or equivalent medications and this is usually adequate. However, some people may have an EpiPen® auto-injector to use if the signs and symptoms worsen or cover any of the above major signs and symptoms. In the scenario listed above, a first aider should ask questions to see if they are ‘anaphylactic’ and have an EpiPen® auto-injector with them.  The signs and symptoms suggest an EpiPen® auto-injector should be used and this should fit with their medical plan.   So, either the casualty self-injects or if you think they are nervous or there are any other issues, then offer to inject the EpiPen® auto-injector.  Someone should ring the ambulance immediately, triple zero (000) and highlight there is a severe allergic reaction-anaphylaxis. The first aid provider should lie the client down unless they are struggling to breathe such as with a child and then this can be done seated.  It is important to check the thigh before injecting so that you do not inject into a wallet, phone or other material such as toys.  It is also important to check the expiry date and even look at the clear box in the middle of the EpiPen®™ auto-injector to see if the fluid is clear and not yellow, brown, or lumpy which suggest changes due to temperature or other reasons. If it is either of these abnormal situations, when you or another person rings the ambulance (000), get permission to use the pen although the ambulance (000) will usually say yes as it may be the only adrenaline present. The current guidelines have changed from June 2017 and now we only inject for 3 seconds into the meaty part of their thigh as opposed to the older model of ten seconds.  Once you have injected the EpiPen® auto-injector, try to calm the casualty and find out if they have a second EpiPen® auto-injector. If they have a second pen, then you would use it after five minutes or they would inject after five minutes if the signs and symptoms were not improving adequately as based on their medical action plan.  The ambulance must be called as many people do not have a second EpiPen® auto-injector and may not improve or may actually worsen over time. So, we need the ambulance as the ambulance has plenty of adrenaline as well as the ability to transport someone to hospital and treat life-threatening symptoms at a higher level than us. The casualty may spend four hours or more being monitored by the hospital and they may have to have extra injections of adrenaline to limit the effects.  Their medical action plan may be adjusted with other medication or even carrying a second EpiPen® auto-injector.  

This is part of the practical skills you will learn and reinforce during one of our face-to-face course days. 

Please see the Allergy website for more information or contact CPR first Aid: https://www.allergy.org.au/


You see someone who is sitting down and is itching their skin and when you introduce yourself, they turn around and speak to you in a hoarse voice, have swollen lips, mouth and tongue and red welts on their skin.  What would you do?

Although we are not doctors and nurses, a First Aider (now called a First Aid Provider) should be able to spot and ask questions to notice major signs and symptoms of a condition, in this case, anaphylaxis or a severe life-threatening allergic reaction.

Like many conditions, someone can have mild, moderate, or severe allergies to various triggers or allergens.  We should always follow the casualties’ medical action plan whether it is formally written and presented to us such as in child care, they have their medical action plan with them and / or they give us information verbally.  In some situations, people have a mild to moderate allergy and will take antihistamines, nasal sprays or equivalent medications and this is usually adequate. However, some people may have an EpiPen® auto-injector to use if the signs and symptoms worsen or cover any of the above major signs and symptoms. In the scenario listed above, a first aider should ask questions to see if they are ‘anaphylactic’ and have an EpiPen® auto-injector with them.  The signs and symptoms suggest an EpiPen® auto-injector should be used and this should fit with their medical plan.   So, either the casualty self-injects or if you think they are nervous or there are any other issues, then offer to inject the EpiPen® auto-injector.  Someone should ring the ambulance immediately, triple zero (000) and highlight there is a severe allergic reaction-anaphylaxis. The first aid provider should lie the client down unless they are struggling to breathe such as with a child and then this can be done seated.  It is important to check the thigh before injecting so that you do not inject into a wallet, phone or other material such as toys.  It is also important to check the expiry date and even look at the clear box in the middle of the EpiPen®™ auto-injector to see if the fluid is clear and not yellow, brown, or lumpy which suggest changes due to temperature or other reasons. If it is either of these abnormal situations, when you or another person rings the ambulance (000), get permission to use the pen although the ambulance (000) will usually say yes as it may be the only adrenaline present. The current guidelines have changed from June 2017 and now we only inject for 3 seconds into the meaty part of their thigh as opposed to the older model of ten seconds.  Once you have injected the EpiPen® auto-injector, try to calm the casualty and find out if they have a second EpiPen® auto-injector. If they have a second pen, then you would use it after five minutes or they would inject after five minutes if the signs and symptoms were not improving adequately as based on their medical action plan.  The ambulance must be called as many people do not have a second EpiPen® auto-injector and may not improve or may actually worsen over time. So, we need the ambulance as the ambulance has plenty of adrenaline as well as the ability to transport someone to hospital and treat life-threatening symptoms at a higher level than us. The casualty may spend four hours or more being monitored by the hospital and they may have to have extra injections of adrenaline to limit the effects.  Their medical action plan may be adjusted with other medication or even carrying a second EpiPen® auto-injector.  

This is part of the practical skills you will learn and reinforce during one of our face-to-face course days. 

Please see the Allergy website for more information or contact CPR first Aid: https://www.allergy.org.au/

Name:*
Email:*

We'll never display or share your email address